Blackberry Jam Pie, 1931

Old cookbooks are just packed with pie recipes! I found this particular recipe in my old Searchlight, a Depression-era cookbook. I’ll be working my way through all the interesting recipes for the rest of my life.

Mastering the pie crust skill isn’t easy. But once you can turn them out reliably, they’re a quick, cheap dessert. And they make an even better breakfast.

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It just so happened that I had some slightly over-cooked (extra thick) homemade blackberry jam in my pantry.  But I’ve made this recipe many times with different jams and they’ve all been delicious. I love the sour cream mixed with the fruit.

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Blackberry Jam Pie
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Ingredients
Servings
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Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Beat egg yolks until thick. Add cream, butter, and jam. Combine 1/2 c. sugar, salt and cornstarch. Add to first mixture. Mix thoroughly. Pour into pastry-lined pie pan. Bake in hot oven (425 degrees) about 25 minutes. Cover with meringue made of egg whites and 3 T. sugar. Brown in slow oven (325 degrees) 20 minutes.

An Enjoyable Vacation at Home; Miss Gladys Harpold, 1914

Miss Gladys Harpold of Assumption, Illinois, won first prize for her story on the subject, “My Most Profitable and Enjoyable Vacation.” She was about fifteen years old when she wrote her story and married the following year. Gladys became the mother five children and died at the age of 90 while residing in California. 

School was over, and now I was to learn something not learned at school, and that was to cook. I was going to learn under whom I thought the best cook in the world, my mother. I was quick to learn how to prepare something for eating, but pies and bread were my failures. After many failures I did learn to make pies, but it seemed as if the art of bread-making would never be learned by me.

Learning to cook led me to want to manage the household also. I wanted mother to visit an aunt and let me keep house, but she decided that she had better stay at home the week I tried to manage everything. Later, I tried it by myself for a week, and father said that I did fine. He and I had coaxed mother to take a little visit. While she was gone grandma taught me to make the longed-for bread. Mother had only been home a few days when I received a letter from my aunt asking me to spend the remainder of my vacation with her. I accepted with pleasure and when I returned three weeks later I was ready to go back to school with the pleasure of knowing that I had learned to cook and keep house, and thinking that I had never had a better or enjoyed a vacation more than that one.

 

 

The Housewife’s Weekly Schedule

It’s been a tradition among housewives to keep a general work schedule for the home. Chances are good that you’ve read about the classic housekeeping schedule that went like this:

Monday-washing (laundry)

Tuesday-ironing

Wednesday-mending

Thursday-marketing/churning/brewing

Friday-cleaning

Saturday-baking

Sunday-rest

It’s incredible to think of how many women used that same basic housework schedule for centuries, even into the last few decades.  Rumor has it the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock on a Monday and after consulting Ye Olde Housework Charte, the women did the laundry. What a relief they didn’t arrive on a Tuesday. They’d have had to spend the day ironing their stinky clothes before grocery shopping on Thursday. It wouldn’t have made a good impression on the new neighbors.

As much as I enjoy history and incorporating long-ago traditions into my modern life, even I don’t hesitate to admit that this schedule is woefully out of date. I can wash a week’s worth of family laundry, hang it all on the outdoor clothesline, fold, and put it away, all within half a day. And I’d be hard-pressed (haha!) to spend more than 30 minutes a month ironing, much less one day a week.

Like any system, a housework schedule has to work for the individual housewife to be useful at all. No system works for everybody. So, inspired by 400+ years of well-scheduled housewives, I came up with my own weekly plan. Of course I have to do some cooking and cleaning every day, but I try to give extra emphasis to one category per day. These are my 5 weekly categories:

Kitchen-batch cooking, baking, and occasional jobs like yogurt, kombucha, etc.

Cleaning-re-organizing, deep-cleaning, decluttering

Office/Errand-paperwork, bills, filing, grocery shopping, library, post office, etc.

Soap-making inventory, packaging, managing online stuff (my tiny business, which gives me my “pin money”)

Free/Flex-visits, outings, home projects, overflow work

I originally assigned one category every day, like the traditional schedule. I gave that up by the second week, when I was invited to go on a shopping “date” with someone the same day I’d scheduled for cleaning. Having a variable schedule works well for me: it gives structure to my week without forcing me to be rigid about it. At the beginning of each week I have a basic idea of how I plan to schedule my week, but I can change it on short notice. On days when I have an appointment scheduled, I try to pile on the rest of my errands for the week while I’m out, or I may reschedule my cleaning day if I learn company will be visiting.

And there will always be those times, like every September (ahem), when I abandon my schedule entirely because every day is either a kitchen day as I finish harvesting my garden or a flex day as we finish up projects and fit in fun stuff during the last few summer-ish weeks. It’s easy to resume the schedule when things slow down a bit, even mid-week. By that time, I’m always glad to be back on a steadier rhythm.

Do you have a weekly housekeeping plan? How do you manage your schedule?

 

Sunday Dinners; by Rose Abnett; 1913

The following is one woman’s solution to simplifying Sunday dinners. Do you have a plan that works for you and your family?

We need to learn to prepare this meal before hand so far as possible. With a little fore thought this can be easily done, so that the Sunday dinner can be ready in fifteen or twenty minutes after you return from church.

Most housekeepers prepare only two meals on Sunday, with a lunch in the evening, so they have an extra good dinner, but do not want to stay at home from church to prepare it. When the family have to wait an hour or more for dinner they are very apt to eat too hurriedly and too much and consequently have a headache the remainder of the day.

Roast chicken and mashed potatoes or roast beef, roast pork or chicken pie can be used for the substantial part of the dinner. Baked beans also make an excellent dish for this meal. Plan to do all that can be done on Saturday. Clean and stuff the chicken on Saturday, put it away in a cool place till morning. Every housewife should have a good roaster, a self baster is best. Before going to church place the chicken in the roaster, or the beef with the potatoes placed around it. The oven should be quite hot when the chicken is put in. After doing this fix the fire so that it will give out a moderate heat. You will soon learn to do this and this portion of the dinner will be nicely done. Put the necessary water in the teakettle and place it on the stove. If you intend to have mashed potatoes, peel the potatoes, cutting into small pieces. While you are getting breakfast, put them into the kettle and cover with cold water.

As soon as you get home, before you change your clothes, turn out the cold water, and pour sufficient hot water from the teakettle and place on the stove. By doing this they will be done by the time the other food is ready. Make the coffee or tea and then you will only have to warm the baked beans and mash the potatoes. Pudding baked the day before can be used as dessert.