After quenching their thirst and resting awhile, they again started on their ceaseless search for “home.” The second night they slept under a lone tree. In the night a hoot owl began his hoarse cry in the branches above and the little wanderers, wakened out a sound slumber, crouched close together in fear, till the coming of day, expecting every minute that an Indian would jump down from the tree and scalp them!

However, when day began to break and a huge bird stretched his neck and flopped his wings and soared out of the tree and away, away, the little girls forgetting for a time their sorry plight, laughed heartily at their being “scared all night at a bird!”

With the coming of daylight the now almost famished and exhausted children started on again in their fruitless search for home. On and on they went across the unknown country, never knowing where nor in what direction, hoping that the rise of the next hill would surely bring them in sight of home!

The third night they came across a dugout which had just been vacated. The children never knew whether the late occupant just left or had been killed by the Indians.

There was bread and meat and cooked beans in the box cupboard and the poor starving children were afraid to eat it! They were afraid the Indians had killed the occupant and poisoned the food so with plenty at hand to appease their hunger, they, with stronger will power than is often found in children of such tender age, refrained from eating and laying themselves down on the bunk the dugout contained, they slept for the first time in many nights with a roof over their heads.

The next morning they were sorely tempted to eat, but being afraid they forbore and started out again the morning of the fourth day, having taken no food at all and only that one drink of dirty water!

All day they tramped and rested, rested and tramped, the hunger growing more intense each minute and the thirst, the awful, maddening thirst, making it hard for them to talk.

In the late afternoon of the fourth day of their tramp, the wanderers looked away across the prairie and saw a moving object. At first they could not tell whether it was a buffalo, a wolf, or what it was. But the object, whatever it might be, was moving and coming in their direction!

Soon they could make out that it was a man on horseback and he was galloping like mad, toward them.

“Oh, it’s an Indian!” gasped the oldest child, “let’s hide quick!” “No,” said the tot of five summers, “I ain’t goin’ to hide, I b’lieve its a soldier huntin’ us, an’ I’m goin’ to stand up where he can see me!”

The older child dropped flat in the grass in an effort to hide but the younger one stood bravely up and waved her tiny hand!

 

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